Pack of wild gaijin feeds in natural habitat

A pack of gaijin roaming central Tokyo has been observed entering its natural habitat and ordering large combo meals.

Locals were advised to avoid contact with the wild gaijin who appeared “restless” and “potentially aggressive” after several days of healthy eating.

Soon after entering its natural habitat the pack of gaijin started showing signs of contentment in the presence of such large amounts of grease.

Scientists believe the gaijin species has learned to survive on chemically processed materials that resemble food and has subsequently evolved to be subconsciously attracted to large yellow ‘M’s.

“The gaijin does possess cognitive recognition of the physiological damage caused by a Big Mac and fries and the grave effects on the general well-being of an individual, but the gaijin is genetically prewired to crave fatty processed food stuffs,” says Professor Takayuki.

Staff were commended for their handling of the situation who quickly handed over the burgers while avoiding eye contact at all times.

Post natural habitat feeding time the wild gaijin started to demonstrate symptoms of a reduction in energy levels.

“Once devouring its favored prey the gaijin becomes lethargic and often begins to regret eating the very thing it had been craving all week,” says Professor Takayuki.